The Launch of My New Website!

February 11, 2009 at 5:03 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , )

vegan-break-logo1

I’m excited to announce the launch of my new website and vegan video series, VeganBreak.com!

I’m starting Vegan Break as an attempt to make veganism more accessible to the general public. I’ll be making short videos a couple times a week about all things vegan–vegan products, book and cookbook reviews, cooking, health, nutrition, under-reported food news, and much more!¬† Here is the first episode:

If you’re vegan, thinking about going vegan, or just interested in healthy compassionate eating and living, I hope you will enjoy my website and find my videos helpful!

Hugs,

Michelle ūüôā

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Thanksgiving Reflection

November 27, 2008 at 12:57 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , )

Dear Friends,
 
¬†¬†¬†¬† I’m spending thanksgiving alone in Ohio this year, so I’ve had some time to reflect. Thanksgiving is such a beautiful tradition of appreication, family, and delicious food. It breaks my heart to know that some people in this world can’t afford a thanksgiving meal or can’t be with their families on this day. For that reason I’ve started making a point of donating a thanksgiving meal to the hungry every year. But just as heartwrenching is the knowledge that at the center of most thanksgiving tables lies the body of an individual who suffered a life of continual discomfort, pain, and misery just so we can eat her at in the course of one meal. It strikes me as a contradiction to the spirit of Thanksgiving that we take the lives of others in order to celebrate our own, especially when it is possible to have healthful and delicious meals without doing so.

turkeyposter

¬†¬†¬†¬† Having a turkey at Thanksgiving¬†is a tradition that we’ve all grown up with, and that we’ve all participated in for a long time, but that few people really think about. We look upon some behaviors and traditions of the past (such as slavery, the treatment of women, the persecution of jews, etc.) with disgust, and wish that people had stopped participating in them. But it is important to notice that injustice is not a thing of the past–it is very much a part of our present day society. We are participants in some of the most intense, widespread, systematic and socially sanctioned suffering ever inflicted by humans on this planet, and that is the production and slaughter of animals for food. It is a horror hidden behind closed doors, and one that will not end until we stop supporting it.
 
I hope that you take a moment this thanksgiving to reflect, to open your heart to the feelings of others, and to embrace the sense of compassion that I know lies within all of us.
 
With love,
 
Michelle

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A Moment for the Cows

November 1, 2008 at 1:04 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , )

A couple months ago I posted a blog entry called “A Moment for the Pigs.”¬† It was so popular that I decided to do a similar post focusing on a different animal that is treated as a commodity in our society today.

Meet: The Cow

The question we all need to be asking ourselves is:  

Are the more than just a number and an item our plate?

Make the connection.  Is it worth it?

They want to live. But it’s not up to them. It’s up to us.

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Peaceable Kingdom (Preview)

October 29, 2008 at 11:16 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , )

This¬†is a preview for Peacable Kingdom, a movie that is guarenteed to touch your heart–as long as you have one ūüėČ

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Finding Sanctuary

October 8, 2008 at 9:32 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Farm Sanctuary, 2008

Farm Sanctuary, 2008

Sanctuary noun 1. A place of refuge.  2. A shelter from danger or hardship.

Finding sanctuary is not something most Americans think about regularly–the lucky ones of us don’t need to at all. Some of us have found it already, and some are still searching. But for the majority of animals on this earth, farm animals, the idea of sanctuary–a place of shelter, protection, and safety, is but a distant dream.

Farm Sanctuaries are some of the most beautiful places in the world. They rescue animals who lived lives as machines in factories, and were in line to die as products being manufactured. Sanctuaries open their doors to animals who have lived through a more horrific hell than any one of us could begin to imagine, and provide them with peace and freedom from the incessant suffering and pain, both mental and physical, that had plagued their prior lives. Farm Sanctuaries are a glimmer of hope in an ice cold world.

I was given the opportunity to visit Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen, NY this past summer for their annual Hoe Down event, and the animals I met there touched my heart in a way I never knew any creature could. It was my first time meeting a cow, and I nearly lost my breath at their patient, gentle characters. The saying “gentle giant” took on a new meaning, for never before had I experience a creature (or person) as gentle, nor as big, as those cows.

And to think, animals in factory farms don’t even have enough room to turn around.

I was so moved my experience with these incredible animals that our society treats as commodities that I wanted to share my experience. As the president of the Case Animal Rights & Ethics Society (CARES) at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, I came back to school this year ready to organize a sanctuary trip for students. I found a closer Sanctuary in Ravenna, Ohio, called Happy Trails Farm Animal Sanctuary, and planned a trip there.

The trip was fantastic. We took a 15 person Case van down to Ravenna and got to spend the afternoon with a farm full of incredibly friendly, not to mention playful, eager and nuzzley farm animals. Here’s a little taste of the trip:

These gentle horses were rescued from slaughter. Horses that can no longer be slaughtered in the US are auctioned off and instead shipped to Mexico for slaughter. The whole process, from auction to transport to slaughter, is incredibly traumatic for the horses. What a sad way to treat a spent horse that not only trusts you, but often would do anything for you.

The event was a huge success, and everyone that came had a fantastic and enlightening experience. Yearly trips to the Sanctuary will definitely become a CARES tradition. To all you readers, if you have never been to a Farm Sanctuary, I cannot recommend it enough. I guarantee it will change your life, as it did mine.

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Top 5 Books that will Change Your Life

August 30, 2008 at 10:19 pm (5 Books that will Change Your Life, Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , )

Each one of the following books changed my life in profound ways. Each managed to shatter many of my conceptions of the world and reshape my perspective on the government, society, and humanity. These books take us behind the comforting media facade and into twisted, brutal realities. These books are disturbing enough to jolt you out of your comfort zone. I highly recommend all of these‚Äď if they don‚Äôt blow your mind I don‚Äôt know what will.

1. The China Study (Colin Campbell)

2. Animal Liberation (Peter Singer)

3. The Food Revolution (John Robbins)

4. The Ethics of What We Eat (Peter Singer)

5. Eternal Treblinka (Charles Patterson)

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You can make a difference

July 12, 2008 at 4:57 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , )

You would think working 8 hours on a Saturday would be torturous–and usually it is, but somehow time slipped away from me¬†today. My summer job working at a medical library left me with nothing to do all day. So, being the procrastinator¬†fantastic time manager that I am, ¬†I decided to start playing around with Audobe Photoshop and the stock-pile of animal photos I’ve been collecting for¬†some time.¬†The result? See for your self:

Well… it’s definitely clear that I’m a novice, but I actually had a lot of fun making these! And one thing’s for sure…I gained a whole new respect for photoshop users. It’s so much more complicated than I thought!¬†¬†

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Voice of the voiceless

June 16, 2008 at 9:39 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , )

Dogs deserve better treatment than this, as do all living sentient beings.

They have no voice, no opposable thumbs, no way to fight for their life back.

It’s time for things to change. It’s time for us to change.

Take a Stand.  

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A Moment for the Pigs

June 7, 2008 at 5:07 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

It’s funny… when I was little I had no idea meat came from real live animals. I though it was just named after them. When I found out the truth,¬†I was horrified. I had no idea I had been eating food that had once had a face, had once been alive and full of feeling and emotion. By age¬†eight I had become a vegetarian.

Today I am a vegan.

This is why:

 

This is not natural. But it is boasted about by the Wisconsin Pork Association!

For all those ham, pork &¬†bacon lovers…

Please take a moment to remember the pigs that died for you.

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Great cheese comes from Happy Cows?

June 6, 2008 at 12:09 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

 

 

 

A close friend asked me a question that I now¬†realize is central to the miscommunication between vegetarians and omnivores. He asked me if I would eat an animal raised on an ‘old-school’ grass farm like that described in the book “Omnivore’s Dilemma” by Michael Pollan. I responded that although I¬†personally would not eat it because I know I don’t need to and¬†I see no reason to kill needlessly, I am not opposed to the killing and eating of these humanely treated animals. What? Yes, you heard me right:

 

I am a vegan and I am not opposed to eating meat.

 

No this isn’t an oxymoron, and no it isn’t rare. It is not meat eating that most vegetarians¬†and vegans¬†are opposed to, but the¬†inhumane treatment¬†of animals while they are alive.¬† I am not opposed to the killing of animals (everyone‚Äôs gotta die, right? And it‚Äôs rarely pleasant), I’m opposed to infliction of unnecessary suffering.¬†I do in fact support grass farms where animals get to live out lives free from intensive confinement, constant pain, suffering, abuse and neglect before they are killed and eaten.

 

Why, then, am I a vegetarian?

 

Unfortunately, 98-99% of the meat in this country is produced through factory farming (Peter Singer, ‚ÄúThe Ethics of What We Eat‚ÄĚ), so ‘humane’ alternatives are very difficult to find. Truly humane meat¬†is almost impossible to find.¬†Labels such as “free range‚ÄĚ ‚Äúhumane certified‚ÄĚ ‚Äúorganic‚ÄĚ etc. are deceiving and in reality¬†mean very little.¬†“Organic” meat and dairy, for example, often comes from animals that suffer more than non-organic animals, because they¬†are kept in the same conditions¬†but are not given antibiotics and¬†treatment that¬†the others are provided.¬†Ultimately, unless I raised the animals¬†myself or visited the¬†farms I¬†purchased meat from,¬†I could not trust that the animals were humanely raised.

 

For anyone interested in this subject, I highly recommend the book ‚ÄúThe Ethics of What We Eat‚ÄĚ by Peter Singer. It‚Äôs an eye opener about the meat industry and its relation with this country. It is an¬†incredibly well researched book, and sheds light on the practices and the labels (“free range‚ÄĚ ‚Äúhumane certified‚ÄĚ ‚Äúorganic‚ÄĚ etc.)¬†without being preachy.

 

 

“Great Cheese Comes From Happy Cows”

 

 

 

 

Do you really believe that?

 

 

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